Charlie's Dragon
You’ve really gotta hand it to short people

brownglucose:

dipschtick:

because they usually can’t reach it anyways.

*kicks the next tall person I see in the shin*

panther-is-the-hottest:

Okay this is gonna sound dumb but…
There’s genderqueer and genderfluid and nonbinary and agender and??? I’m just not really understanding what these…mean? Like I am genderfluid, but would that be the same as genderqueer or any of the others mentioned? I’m just so very confused im sorry

Aah, I might muck this up, so sorry if I give the wrong information, this is just how I understand the different terms and different people might use them differently.

Genderfluid: Female some days, male other days. (Or just more masculine/feminine.)

Genderqueer: I’m not sure, but I think it’s a mix and match thing? Like some male/masculine attributes, some female/feminine, all rolled into one package.

Nonbinary: Doesn’t fit into society’s idea of female and male. I guess they can be feminine/masculine anyway, but don’t feel like boy or girl (man or woman) is a fitting label.

Agender: Neither male nor female, just… a person. And persons are nice. Just take it at face value and don’t question it, I guess?

I guess it’s either very subtle nuances or different aspects of the same, bigger thing, and people use the different labels according to what feels natural to them. It’s a bit like some homosexual woman prefer being referred to as lesbian, others prefer gay, some homosexual men are okay with being called queer, others are not… except this is… not quite like that.

Sorry, that probably wasn’t a sufficient answer all in all. As a cis person I’m not the best to answer this, but at least it serves as an example of what someone thinks?

education-101:

Women in Ancient Egypt

  • Women and men in ancient Egypt enjoyed the same legal and economic rights. Women could divorce their husbands and remarry.
  • Women and men were also subject to the same punishments.
  • Women worked many of the same jobs men did, most in the fields. Life was tough, though women did live longer than men (58, 54)
  • Women could hold political office, with several examples of female pharaohs available. There were at least 5, not including the Cleopatras and other Greek rulers.
  • Women could also hold lower political office, with many being scribes.
  • Women who were on their periods were considered to be removing impurities. They were excused from work and forbidden from some religious areas.
  • It is worth noting that when Egypt was conquered by Greece, Egyptian women retained many more rights than their Greek counterparts.
accio-percabeth:

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 
Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness. 
Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)
And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 
THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 


THANK YOU.

accio-percabeth:

tfios-changed-my-life:

So this little cigarette right here has sparked a whole new brand of TFiOS hate, much of which is coming from people who claimed to love the book. 

Many people are now pointing out how “pretentious” Augustus is, and I can’t help but think, You’re only just now realizing this. He was written to be a seemingly pretentious and arrogant person. The acknowledgement of this is actually highly important because, without it, the book loses the message that a hero’s journey is that of strength to weakness

Augustus Waters has big dreams for himself. He wants to be known and remembered; he wants to be a hero; he wants to be seen as perfect. But there’s already something standing in his way… He has a disability, and society tells him that a person cannot be both perfect and disabled. So what does he do? He creates a persona for himself. He tries to appear older and wiser than he is. But the pretentious side of him is NOT who he truly is. It’s all an act. (This is evident in the fact that he often uses words in the wrong context.)

And when his cancer returns, we begin to see his mask cracking. The true Augustus begins to bleed through… Hazel even takes notice of this from time to time. And by the time we get to the gas station scene, Augustus is no longer the picture of perfection he was when we met him. The play has been canceled. The actor must reveal himself. And he’s revealed to be a weak, defenseless boy, succumbing to the cancer that is made of him. 

THE PRETENTIOUSNESS IS INTENTIONAL. It stands to show Augustus’s journey from flawless to flawed, from strong to weak. It’s the key to understanding that Augustus was the hero he always wanted to be, even if he didn’t realized it. 

THANK YOU.

dontkillbirds:

Doctor Who is no longer my fave TV show and you have no idea how sad that makes me

weasley-detectives:

Be excellent to each other.

dontneedyourheroact:

what i love about mythbusters is that once they bust a myth they manipulate their variables until something finally explodes bc we all know why you’re really watching this show

donc-desole:

idontlikeitpaintitred:

A   C O N T I N U A T I O N   O F   T H I S

NOTE: Because of many people’s similar reaction to my previous post, I feel the need to clarify that this series isn’t intended to have a Hans-apologist kind of vibe. My purpose here is not to excuse his behaviour in the film or to get people to pity him. I just wanted to add a little bit of ‘depth’ where it was suggested there were stories behind his actions. I’m basically trying to figure out a possible background and progression that could explain why and how he was shaped into a villain, if we accept some villains are made rather than born. But I get some people want this character to be evil for the sake of being evil, and that is completely fine! So please don’t get too upset over these, keep in mind this is just my take on a hypothetic past, loosely based on hints from the movie and what Frozen directors have revealed so far.

Inspiration from rennydraws for the 8th panel and donc-desole for the last one.

Oh…Oh my god. I am completely unworthy of even having been mentioned and I am sincerely honored to have inspired even an ounce of this gorgeous artwork…

I absolutely loved the first set, and it’s still one of my most favorite fandom works to date.  And this second one is no less spectacular!! 

fantagraphics:

bogleech:

gameraboy:

"A Sticky Situation" (1960) by Carl Barks

I like how advertising is literally still exactly as sexist as they’re joking about in this comic from 54 years ago.

Barks!